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31 May 2011 @ 09:48 am
Don't believe what you feel  
Over the weekend, a wide-ranging discussion on my porch reminded me of a lesson I first learned in psych 101 in college, about how people use their physical symptoms as a clue to their mental and emotional state. In the study I remember, participants were given adrenaline. Some participants were told that they'd been dosed with adrenaline, and what some of the symptoms they could expect were (a feeling of anxiety, pounding or racing heart, increased body temp, etc), and the other participants weren't told either of these things. Then, both groups were asked to answer a series of questions about their mood and state of mind.

Participants who knew that they could attribute their physical state to an external cause tended to have more relaxed responses. They knew that their trembling hands weren't due to threat, anger, or other upset, but to a chemical they'd consumed, and that allowed them to separate their physical experience from their mental one.

This piece of knowledge has come in useful for me time and again. Especially when I'm sick, or underslept, but also after I've had too much caffeine, or am feeling overheated or chilled or any of a myriad of other "imperfect" physical states, it's so good to be able to (at least some of the time) step back from my internal freakout and realize that at least part of what's happening is that my mind, lacking something to attribute my discomfort to, is finding the nearest source of anxiety, worry, sadness, or anger, and pasting that onto what I'm feeling physically.

It was great to have been reminded about this in conversation this weekend, because it came up dramatically last night, when I found myself not sleeping for hours, despite being pretty wiped out after the weekend, because of fretting about my temp job ending and not having something else lined up yet. I had a stomach ache, was feeling overheated, my heart was racing, and after tossing and turning for a couple of hours, I was thinking, "Wow, I had no idea I was so anxious about this!"

Then I realized that over the course of the day, I had consumed a fair amount of the very intense habanero vodka that spike and I made yesterday, and that, in fact, that probably accounted for all of my physical symptoms. Indeed, after realizing that, I was able to identify all of my symptoms more individually, rather than feeling them all simply as a mass of "things aren't okay in here!" Then, having done that, I could tell that while, yes, I do have some nervousness about the next step in my job search and general employment, I wasn't sleeping mainly because my body was out of whack.

This all reminds me of one of the overarching messages of Mindsight, which is that a psyche in balance can experience emotions without being overwhelmed by them. And it also reminds me that all of this sort of thing is more a practice than a state of being. Practice every day.
 
 
I'm feeling: sleepysleepy
 
 
 
unintentional baitredheadedmuse on May 31st, 2011 01:55 pm (UTC)
This is really interesting stuff. And I am pasting the last bit about practice vs. state of being on my brain for future reference.
existential hot showerveek on May 31st, 2011 02:51 pm (UTC)
Am reading Mindsight myself just now, and there's just so much thought that runs in parallel with Vipassana (and, I imagine, other meditation practices). But they're coming at it from completely different world views.

I love when that happens.
Molotov Coqtiz: cameraeestiplika on May 31st, 2011 04:07 pm (UTC)
::nods::

I really appreciate the way you articulate(d) this.
phoenixamber_phoenix on May 31st, 2011 04:31 pm (UTC)
Yes.

I love a corollary of this as well - that if I get my physical well-being in line, it often bolsters my emotional/psychological/etc well-being.
Kcatkcatalyst on May 31st, 2011 05:04 pm (UTC)
Boy howdy! Remind me of that the next time I'm refusing to go for my run. I went again yesterday after a month off and it was like my whole emotional system went "aaahhh, THANK YOU".
born from jets!!!catness on May 31st, 2011 05:04 pm (UTC)
That's kind of related to a thing I've been noticing in the last week or so. I pretty much had an epically shitty and overtaxing week. Truly unrealistic amounts of stress with day job and band stuff both spiraling completely out of control in an extremely limited timeframe. But whatever else my supplements cocktail from my doctor may or may not be doing, I definitely did not lose my mind over anything and it feels like it may be the chemical balance. Any one thing that went wrong was lose-my-mind-worthy last week, yet despite maybe a dozen of those, I didn't flip the fuck out. I'd like to thank my sponsors Pantothenic Acid, Vitamin C, Vitamin B12, Co Q-10, Acetyl L-Carnitine, Vitamin D, Vitamin E, and L-Tryptophan. :)
Theory Slut: Balloondesiringsubject on May 31st, 2011 06:21 pm (UTC)
One time, in high school, I was prescribed an antibiotic that had a high high probability of gastrointestinal side effects. Pre-internet, and I was a twerpy kid so didn't read any literature and my doc didn't tell me. By the time, a few days later, I got back to the infirmary, I was CONVINCED I was dying, pure and simple. The doc said that she didn't like to tell people the side effects because then they ended up complaining that they had them either way. I thought this was a dumb reason, even though I recognize that it's totally possible to give placebo side-effects by predicting them. But still. Anyway, I saw that story as resonating somewhat with yours...
Madame Blue aka Pygment: SWLucysweetmmeblue on May 31st, 2011 11:18 pm (UTC)
corollary
I use a corollary to this and that is "feelings aren't facts". In the same way that physical feelings do not mean a direct relationship with emotional state, emotional state does not mean a direct relationship with something actually being wrong either.
Medyanimedyani on June 1st, 2011 01:06 am (UTC)
oh. yeah. That book. Loan?