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19 March 2010 @ 12:11 pm
 
What's an observation that, when you say it, you usually mean as a compliment, but that you think is more widely regarded as negative?

What about the reverse: a thing that you usually mean as an insult or critique that most people seem to think is a compliment?
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born from jets!!!: rhinestone treblecatness on March 19th, 2010 05:02 pm (UTC)
The first, probably a lot of my music critique. ;) I think *most* musicians get what I'm saying, though, although non-musicians would totally not understand.

The second, also in regard to music, "I like what you were trying to do there."

D. Fennelfennel on March 19th, 2010 05:34 pm (UTC)
I couldn't think of an answer to the question until I saw yours-- yeah, much of what I say about music is taken as dismissive or critical when I mean it to be positive (if not wildly enthusiastic).
born from jets!!!catness on March 20th, 2010 01:38 am (UTC)
Heh.
David Policardpolicar on March 19th, 2010 05:04 pm (UTC)
"You're a strange human being." is the first one that comes to mind.

But it's more common in my life that what I am going out of my way to construct as a neutral observation gets read as either a compliment or an insult.
blkblk on March 19th, 2010 05:12 pm (UTC)
Among many of my friends/partners, calling someone "weird" or "geek." We all know and play with the layers of meaning.
Beowabbitbeowabbit on March 19th, 2010 06:05 pm (UTC)
Not quite what you’re asking, but when I was a kid I used to respond to “You’re weird” (which I heard a lot) with a cheery “Thank you!”
Ellen: with kidletkeyne on March 20th, 2010 11:33 pm (UTC)
My kids (especially M.) love hearing "You are such a strange child."
harimad on March 19th, 2010 06:43 pm (UTC)
Feeling a little negative today
re 1. anything along the lines that a person, event, or action is unusual, unique, atypical.

re 2. anything along the lines that a person, event, or action is normal, common, typical.

"You've lost weight" and "You've gained weight" are special cases. Societal norms dictate the first is a complement and the second a criticism. My usage depends entirely on the circumstances of the person I'm talking to.
Roy Battyroy_batty on March 19th, 2010 07:57 pm (UTC)
Variants on "There's no arguing with logic like that!"

Often taken to mean: 'Oh, my logic is so good he can't argue with it'.

What I usually mean: 'You have a logical chain which starts from such an unsupported/unsupportable premise as to render your entire argument invalid - thus I can not argue the higher points with you because they have no supportable possibile validity to argue against.' Either that or 'Your critical skills are either so lacking, or so skewed to supporting a desired result rather than open inquiry, that there is no point in engaging in logical argument because that is not criteria you will actually consider.'
Will O'the Wispwotw on March 19th, 2010 09:13 pm (UTC)
What's an observation that, when you say it, you usually
mean as a compliment, but that you think is more widely
regarded as negative?


Slut.